For the Cat that Has Everything

Cats are entitled to be treated like royalty -- at least they seem to think so. We just exist merely to serve their every wish and whim. So give your cats the royal treatment they deserve (and you're all too happy to give) with these regal products, designed to pamper your furry little prince or princess.

Cat Condo
What cat could possibly resist the posh comfort of the stately Cat Condo from Hollywood Kitty Co? Touted as the "cat's meow," this kitty condo provides a place for your royal highness to play, lounge, climb, hide, and scratch. (The front post is covered in sisal, a durable plant fiber that, when woven, resembles a heavy coiled rope.) Great for cats of all ages and abilities.

Chateaneuf du Chat -- Herb du Catnip
Literally translated, its name means "Wine of the Cat," and perhaps rightly so. Let your cat roll in some catnip from this wine-shaped bottle, and it'll behave just like a drunken princess at the ball. Ooh-la-la!

KittyWalk Stroller
For those pampered pusses that have never put their paws to the pavement, we suggest riding in style in the KittyWalk Stroller. This upscale "kitty SUV" allows your cat to experience the great outdoors from the safety of an enclosed space. Made for housecats that love the fresh air, but don't enjoy being led around on a commoner's leash.

Lulu's Garden Retreat Pet Bed
This bed is purrfect for kitties that love to catnap in complete comfort. Lulu's Garden Retreat pet bed is fashioned out of wrought iron and is decorated with carved flowers, braided posts, and a lovely crystal finial fit for a queen. Four feline-friendly pillows are available for surrounding comfort.

A Jeweled Cat Collar
No royal ensemble would be complete without a sparkling accessory. A jeweled cat collar are made of imported leather and adorned with genuine Rhinestones and crystals, each individually set for added beauty and security. They vary in sizes and several eye-catching colors.

Hagen Living World Pet Spa
All princesses relish a day at the spa, and their feline counterparts are no different. The Hagen Living World Pet Spa boasts a multitude of textures and activities that will keep even the fussiest cat interested for hours. The flat surfaces feature accupressure pads that feel wonderful underneath a cat's paws; the center surface is a Ripple Massager topped by a Gum Stimulator for healthy chewing. There are also three Body Stroke Groomers for self-grooming and massage.

Outdoor Bungalow Cat House
Her royal highness can't be expected to stay cramped in one royal residence all year-round! The Outdoor Bungalow Cat House (or, as we like to call it, "The Country House") lets your cat venture outdoors, yet provides a cozy shelter when the wind is howling. Each house comes with three windows, allowing the sun to shine in and your kitty to peer out. And here's a bonus: It's easy on the eyes and unobtrusively blends in with all environments. Add-ons such as a breezeway, a sun deck, a back door, and a second story are up to you and your kitty.

Mink Cape
Sure, your cat already has a fur coat, but even kitties need to make a fashion statement on special occasions. So, why not treat kitty to a luxurious mink cape (faux, of course) that will warm its coat, along with its heart. This is Kitty Couture at its finest!

Christmas Tree Needles and Your Cat Don't Mix

Tis the season. The lights are up, the tinsel is sparkling, the fridge is stocked and the mistletoe is hung. And the tree is also up, which means you've got a serious health risk ready to ruin your otherwise perfect Holiday for you and your cat. Cat are by nature curious, playful creatures, and some of them will become very mischievous if given the chance, and the little pine needles that fall off your Christmas tree over the course a few week provide a temptation they might not be able to resist. Natural Christmas trees you buys at you local church or vacant lot were most likely grown a few hundred miles away on a farm or in the woods, and are usually treated with herbicides, pesticides and other chemicals to preserve them through the Holidays. The chemicals concentrate in the boughs and the needles can become toxic. If ingested, this chemical cocktail can make your cat very sick. Symptoms range from vomiting and diarrhea to coughing and loss of appetite, which can make for an unpleasant Holiday break. Hopefully your cat will vomit up the needles and not repeat the mistake. But, in the event that the needles make it into your cat's digestive tract, the then the real problems begin. The needles can damage or even puncture the lining of you cat's stomach or intestine, and could result in a very large veterinary bill or even worse.

So, what are the best ways to minimize the risks of this kind of disaster? Here are three easy steps toward keeping your car safe:

  1. Know your cat. Understanding that your cat is prone to accidents and mischief is key.
  2. Sweep Up. If your cat is prone to get into trouble, frequent sweeping up of the needles is an easy way to lower risk.
  3. Deny Access. Keep furniture away from the tree so your cat can't get at the boughs and needles still on the tree, and you should spray the lower boughs of the tree with a pet repellent for further discouragement.

This might seem like a lot of trouble to go through, but consider the alternatives and you'll agree that it is the best gift you can give yourself and you cat this Holiday season. For information on keeping your pet dog from the Christmas tree needles, please visit here.

Does Cat Behavior Change With the Seasons?

All mammals are affected by changes in the environment. For example, have you ever felt sleepy during rainy days? The lower light levels tend to lull us into a more relaxed mood.

Such changes happen minute by minute, day to day, and week to week. Temperature, light levels, colors, odors and everything else that stimulate our senses are often not static. Seasonal changes are therefore more pronounced, so it’s true that your cat’s behavior is likely to change with the seasons.

Dennis Turner, author of The Domestic Cat: The Biology of Its Behaviour, reports that feral cats are particularly active during the spring and summer months. These cats, which have to fend for themselves, are out and about for one-third of the day and three-quarters of the night, only resting at dawn and dusk.

Domesticity, along with spaying and neutering, can affect those behaviors, which are driven, in large part, by hormones. I’ve noticed, however, that even spayed and neutered cats can still have some mating and hunting drives. Both females and males may therefore be a bit more active during the spring and summer.

Warm spring or summer days, however, can counter hormonally induced mating-related activity. On a hot day, you are likely to find your cat sleeping on a cool, comfy spot, and for good reason. In the wild, remaining active in such weather could deplete valuable water intake and lead to overheating.

We all have internal body clocks that help us adjust to gradual changes, along with the more major ones that we associate with different seasons. Consider keeping a cat diary noting your pet’s activity levels at certain times, and what your cat is doing. You will probably start to see predictable patterns over time.

Easy Exercises for Your Cat

If you think our distant human ancestors were extremely active back in the day, imagine what life was like for your cat’s relatives before they enjoyed provided food, cozy laps and other care. Physical activity was survival -- not just exercise.

Most healthy cats need to maintain a certain level of activity for basic physical fitness. Their bodies evolved to handle this -- not a couch potato lifestyle. While it’s difficult to tone individual cat muscles, you can encourage your cat to get sufficient exercise for overall body toning.

The ASPCA offers the following tips for making exercise interesting and enjoyable for your cat:

Stay engaged. Cats don’t usually like when you plunk a toy in front of them and then walk away. They are far more interested in spending time with you, so set aside time each day to encourage your cat to play.

Try leash training. Teaching your cat to walk on a leash is a tremendous health investment. The sights and smells will get your cat excited about walking, and this gives you an incentive to walk more as well.

Invest in climbing objects. Enclosed outdoor areas with cat trees and other objects for climbing can also help to get cats interested in physical activity while staying safe. Consider adding one to your home, if possible.

Determine your cat’s preferred method of play. Some cats like to jump. Some are more inclined to run. Some are stalkers. Purchase cat toys with these preferences in mind. The old adage about how kids prefer to play with the box instead of the toy may hold true for cats. Old Ping-Pong balls, cardboard boxes, paper shopping bags, and packing paper can all be toys to a cat with a little coaxing. Usually if you are interested in an object, your cat will be too.

Is Water From a Christmas Tree Stand Harmful to Cats?

Back in the day, Christmas trees were usually just sold with a basic wooden base nailed to the bottom. You’d haul the tree home, stick it in a corner and then watch the needles dry out as the days went on. By Christmas, the tree would often be more than ready for recycling.

Now, many of us opt for a base that permits the addition of liquids. As Charla Dawson, owner of Dapper Dog and Classy Cat, points out, “The water itself is not poisonous, but if a fertilizer was added to the water, it may be poisonous. This fertilizer may cause the pet to suffer with diarrhea and vomiting.” (Tree preservatives may also be added to the water, helping to keep the tree fresh.) Dawson therefore advises that you cover the base.

A quick and easy remedy is to just put some well-secured foil or plastic wrap over the water in the base. However, some crafty types take this task to another decorative level. One impressive example is a pretty cover made out of burlap, as seen on the DIY Showoff blog. With some imagination, you can probably come up with other clever solutions.

Even if you just put plain water in the stand, I would advise covering the exposed base. The tree, which may have been sprayed with insecticides or other chemicals, will leach compounds into the water. It’s better to be ultra-safe than sorry when it comes to the holidays and your cat.

If you have a dog, try our tips to keeping your dog safe at Christmas time here.