Improving the Quality of Life for Cats and Cat Lovers

The Daily Cat delivers health, nutrition, training and behavior news and resources for cat owners and cat lovers

For the Cat that Has Everything

Cats are entitled to be treated like royalty -- at least they seem to think so. We just exist merely to serve their every wish and whim. So give your cats the royal treatment they deserve (and you're all too happy to give) with these regal products, designed to pamper your furry little prince or princess.

Cat Condo
What cat could possibly resist the posh comfort of the stately Cat Condo from Hollywood Kitty Co? Touted as the "cat's meow," this kitty condo provides a place for your royal highness to play, lounge, climb, hide, and scratch. (The front post is covered in sisal, a durable plant fiber that, when woven, resembles a heavy coiled rope.) Great for cats of all ages and abilities.

Chateaneuf du Chat -- Herb du Catnip
Literally translated, its name means "Wine of the Cat," and perhaps rightly so. Let your cat roll in some catnip from this wine-shaped bottle, and it'll behave just like a drunken princess at the ball. Ooh-la-la!

KittyWalk Stroller
For those pampered pusses that have never put their paws to the pavement, we suggest riding in style in the KittyWalk Stroller. This upscale "kitty SUV" allows your cat to experience the great outdoors from the safety of an enclosed space. Made for housecats that love the fresh air, but don't enjoy being led around on a commoner's leash.

Lulu's Garden Retreat Pet Bed
This bed is purrfect for kitties that love to catnap in complete comfort. Lulu's Garden Retreat pet bed is fashioned out of wrought iron and is decorated with carved flowers, braided posts, and a lovely crystal finial fit for a queen. Four feline-friendly pillows are available for surrounding comfort.

A Jeweled Cat Collar
No royal ensemble would be complete without a sparkling accessory. A jeweled cat collar are made of imported leather and adorned with genuine Rhinestones and crystals, each individually set for added beauty and security. They vary in sizes and several eye-catching colors.

Hagen Living World Pet Spa
All princesses relish a day at the spa, and their feline counterparts are no different. The Hagen Living World Pet Spa boasts a multitude of textures and activities that will keep even the fussiest cat interested for hours. The flat surfaces feature accupressure pads that feel wonderful underneath a cat's paws; the center surface is a Ripple Massager topped by a Gum Stimulator for healthy chewing. There are also three Body Stroke Groomers for self-grooming and massage.

Outdoor Bungalow Cat House
Her royal highness can't be expected to stay cramped in one royal residence all year-round! The Outdoor Bungalow Cat House (or, as we like to call it, "The Country House") lets your cat venture outdoors, yet provides a cozy shelter when the wind is howling. Each house comes with three windows, allowing the sun to shine in and your kitty to peer out. And here's a bonus: It's easy on the eyes and unobtrusively blends in with all environments. Add-ons such as a breezeway, a sun deck, a back door, and a second story are up to you and your kitty.

Mink Cape
Sure, your cat already has a fur coat, but even kitties need to make a fashion statement on special occasions. So, why not treat kitty to a luxurious mink cape (faux, of course) that will warm its coat, along with its heart. This is Kitty Couture at its finest!

Litter Box Solutions for All Cats

When you brought your cat into your home, you committed to providing love and care forever. But one thing you didn't promise is to sacrifice your aesthetic sensibility and keep a drab plastic box in your kitchen until the end of time. And now you don't have to. These days, there are a slew of attractive alternatives to the standard litter box. Finding the right one for your home is simply a matter of your taste -- and your cat's.

Uncovered Boxes
Portland, Oregon-based feline behavioral consultant Mieshelle Nagelschneider says 70 percent of cats prefer uncovered boxes. "Covered boxes tend to trap odors and keep the litter moist longer, and both of these are a big deterrent for cats," she explains. "Escape potential is also important to them, especially once they reach social maturity, and a covered box doesn't allow for an easy out." Most litter box solutions do come in the form of covered boxes. If your cat insists on an uncovered box (and it will make its preference known), you can get creative and decorate your own box, or try something like Sittin' Pretty Cat Products' litter basket -- an acrylic-lined willow basket that can be stained or painted to suit your style.

Flummoxed about what to do with her own cat's unsightly litter, Boston cat owner Lindsay Potter bought an all-purpose tub at a hardware store, and a large piece of canvas from an art supplier. "I painted the canvas to contrast nicely with my bathroom. I used a staple gun to attach it to the tub. It looks a lot nicer, and the tub has high walls, perfect for my male cat."

Faux Furniture
One innovative and attractive type of covered litter box looks more like a cabinet than a restroom for kitty. The Refined Feline, for example, offers a closed wooden cabinet with a hidden side-door. Another option comes from Felinerina, featuring a white bathroom cabinet with wainscoting panels, shelf space and towel bars -- the litter box goes inside, your cat enters through a space carved from the front of the cabinet. And another style, made by Pet's Best Products, hides the litter box in a faux plant pot, complete with the fake plant of your choice sprouting from the top.

"Some cats will use a box no matter what its design, and that kind of cat would do well with a box that falls into this innovative category," says Nagelschneider. "If you choose this design, make sure it's roomy and kept clean. Also, bear in mind that it may be better tolerated by felines in single-cat homes."

Kitty Cabanas
You don't have to buy an entire piece of furniture to hide an unsightly box. The most common (and least expensive) type of litter concealer is simply a cover placed over the box. NYC Dog & Cat suggests that you hide your cat's litter box under a high gloss laminate design (a palazzo, a country manor, an antique bookcase, or a plain damask cover). Petaroo offers simple basket-weave covers that blend into any space. Top-loading boxes, available at most pet supply stores, come with their own covers (with openings in the top for your cat's entry), and are good for male cats that aim high.

"The litter box cover saved my relationship," laughs Austin, Texas cat owner Brian Nash. "My girlfriend didn't want to move in unless I could offer her a closet, but the extra closet was where I kept Paul's litter box, and I didn't want the box out and exposed in my apartment. The cover helped us both get what we wanted." With a little bit of trial and error, you and your feline friend can get what you want, too. 

Clever Cat Scratching & Climbing Posts

Even though every feline has its own personality and quirks, scratching and climbing are second nature for all cats. Because this is an immutable kitty truth,  cat owners should provide a special place for their furry friend to claw, clamber and leap.  If not, you risk a lifetime of shredded sofas and knocked-over knick-knacks (as well as an unhappy companion). Fortunately, there are all kinds of new and entertaining climbers available these days -- enough to meet your cat's demands, as well as your aesthetic sensibility.

Scratching that Itch
Just as you need a good morning stretch to get your day started, your cat also needs a good morning scratch. Scratching is good for your cat's health because it removes dead skin cells from claw sheaths. It also allows your cat to mark territory with scent, and to stretch muscles and ligaments. The best post for your cat, then, is tall enough to allow it to extend to full height; the post should also be sturdy enough for your cat to lean its full body weight on.

Scratching posts are generally covered with rough, shreddable material. Sisal rope and faux fur make the least mess, although many cats prefer scratching on carpeting due to its multiple loops. (Warning: These loops could eventually be shredded and end up in tiny bits on your floor!) When the post is worn out, both sisal rope and carpet posts can be resurfaced with simple carpet tacks or nails.

Kathy Kruger of Plymouth, Michigan found that scratching posts kept her cats from destroying her wooden furniture. "When I first brought Max and Sarah home, they were doing a real number on my kitchen chairs," she recalls. "My vet recommended a sisal post, and they were immediately attracted to that." To encourage a less enthusiastic pet to scratch a new post, reward it for scratching with a treat or some extra affection; you can also rub your cat's paws on the post to deposit its scent, or spray the post with catnip.

The Thrill of the Climb
Cat castles and cat trees are full-service climbing-scratching-lounging destinations. Some are free-standing with heavy bases to prevent tipping, while others extend floor to ceiling, usually relying on a spring-tension rod to keep them upright. They offer cats open areas for sleeping, posts for scratching and multiple levels for leaping. Free-standing models are best for one-cat homes, and for small to medium-size felines. Because they offer more stability, floor-to-ceiling models are more appropriate for multiple-cat dwellings, or large, heavy cats. If your kitty is larger than average, make sure the castle doors are wide enough for it to fit through comfortably.

"When my boyfriend moved in with all of his stuff, there was suddenly less room on my tall bookcases and on top of the refrigerator, and I was worried that my cat Cleo wouldn't get the exercise he needed," says Linda Bain of Garden City, New York. "So we found a nice wooden cat tree on the Internet. It sits unobtrusively in the corner, and Cleo loves it."

House of Style
Satisfying your cat's needs doesn't mean sacrificing your sense of style. The key to combining feline and human furniture is all about blending. "Look first and foremost for color. Make sure it doesn't stand out in contrast to everything else in the room," advises Karen Powell, a Connecticut-based interior designer and co-founder of Decor and You. "Then place the post or gym strategically in relationship to the other furniture, away from the focal point of the room, and outside of the traffic flow." Before you invest, visit a variety of pet supply stores and Web sites to get a broad picture of what's available. Your cat will thank you kindly.

Christmas Tree Needles and Your Cat Don't Mix

Tis the season. The lights are up, the tinsel is sparkling, the fridge is stocked and the mistletoe is hung. And the tree is also up, which means you've got a serious health risk ready to ruin your otherwise perfect Holiday for you and your cat. Cat are by nature curious, playful creatures, and some of them will become very mischievous if given the chance, and the little pine needles that fall off your Christmas tree over the course a few week provide a temptation they might not be able to resist. Natural Christmas trees you buys at you local church or vacant lot were most likely grown a few hundred miles away on a farm or in the woods, and are usually treated with herbicides, pesticides and other chemicals to preserve them through the Holidays. The chemicals concentrate in the boughs and the needles can become toxic. If ingested, this chemical cocktail can make your cat very sick. Symptoms range from vomiting and diarrhea to coughing and loss of appetite, which can make for an unpleasant Holiday break. Hopefully your cat will vomit up the needles and not repeat the mistake. But, in the event that the needles make it into your cat's digestive tract, the then the real problems begin. The needles can damage or even puncture the lining of you cat's stomach or intestine, and could result in a very large veterinary bill or even worse.

So, what are the best ways to minimize the risks of this kind of disaster? Here are three easy steps toward keeping your car safe:

  1. Know your cat. Understanding that your cat is prone to accidents and mischief is key.
  2. Sweep Up. If your cat is prone to get into trouble, frequent sweeping up of the needles is an easy way to lower risk.
  3. Deny Access. Keep furniture away from the tree so your cat can't get at the boughs and needles still on the tree, and you should spray the lower boughs of the tree with a pet repellent for further discouragement.

This might seem like a lot of trouble to go through, but consider the alternatives and you'll agree that it is the best gift you can give yourself and you cat this Holiday season. For information on keeping your pet dog from the Christmas tree needles, please visit here.