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Flicks for Felines

Flicks for Felines

Watching a cat watch TV is funny, right? And lately, you can go to YouTube and see dozens and dozens of clips showing feisty cats pawing televisions, eager to get their mitts on the squirrel, the bird or some other natural feline prey skittering about on the screen.

"Some cats even run around the back of the television trying to find the bird that flew 'off' the screen," says Steve Malarkey, creator of Video Catnip, a DVD that features two hours of feline-friendly footage. "Cats really do watch movies, and it's especially good for indoor cats. It's a lot of fun to see how the cats react to the TV."

Malarkey has sold more than 350,000 copies of Video Catnip, with a 98 percent success rate -- pet owners regularly write him with their stories of how the DVD calmed and entertained their cat. "A cat DVD is great when the owner leaves the house," says Malarkey. "Cats get bored, and some cats get stressed or worried that their mommy or daddy isn't coming back. Some cats just stare at the screen, but they are definitely watching. The DVD reduces their stress and helps with separation anxieties."

Popping in a DVD for your cat might seem odd, especially since veterinarians rarely go on record regarding the exact details of feline vision. What we do know is that cats see quick movements (just ask anyone whose cat plays with a laser light), and that critters such as butterflies, dragonflies, lizards, squirrels, chipmunks and birds are natural feline prey. Movies such as Malarkey's occupy the cat, distracting those often anxious home-alone feelings. 

Below is a list of feline-friendly flicks that are sure to get rave reviews and two paws up from your cat:

  1. Video Catnip: This bestselling DVD features two hours of footage of birds, squirrels and chipmunks.
  2. Cat-TV II: This 60-minute DVD showcases fish, mice and other rodents to entertain adventurous cats everywhere.
  3. Kitty Safari I and Kitty Safari II: These 30-minute DVDs feature all-music soundtracks, which could be a draw for the kitty that likes music played when its owner leaves the house.
  4. Lullabies and Butterflies: This 60-minute DVD is made for infants and toddlers, but cats love its quiet, peaceful nature scenes set to lullabies.
  5. Cedar Lake Nature Series: Nature's Bird Talk: This DVD features a full hour of footage of beautiful birds in their natural environment, accompanied by their melodic birdcalls.
  6. Animal Rescue: Volume 2: Best Cat Rescues: Okay, this one is about the big cats, but what domestic cat wouldn't like seeing its brave cousins make it out of sticky situations?

For the Cat that Has Everything

Cats are entitled to be treated like royalty -- at least they seem to think so. We just exist merely to serve their every wish and whim. So give your cats the royal treatment they deserve (and you're all too happy to give) with these regal products, designed to pamper your furry little prince or princess.

Cat Condo
What cat could possibly resist the posh comfort of the stately Cat Condo from Hollywood Kitty Co? Touted as the "cat's meow," this kitty condo provides a place for your royal highness to play, lounge, climb, hide, and scratch. (The front post is covered in sisal, a durable plant fiber that, when woven, resembles a heavy coiled rope.) Great for cats of all ages and abilities.

Chateaneuf du Chat -- Herb du Catnip
Literally translated, its name means "Wine of the Cat," and perhaps rightly so. Let your cat roll in some catnip from this wine-shaped bottle, and it'll behave just like a drunken princess at the ball. Ooh-la-la!

KittyWalk Stroller
For those pampered pusses that have never put their paws to the pavement, we suggest riding in style in the KittyWalk Stroller. This upscale "kitty SUV" allows your cat to experience the great outdoors from the safety of an enclosed space. Made for housecats that love the fresh air, but don't enjoy being led around on a commoner's leash.

Lulu's Garden Retreat Pet Bed
This bed is purrfect for kitties that love to catnap in complete comfort. Lulu's Garden Retreat pet bed is fashioned out of wrought iron and is decorated with carved flowers, braided posts, and a lovely crystal finial fit for a queen. Four feline-friendly pillows are available for surrounding comfort.

A Jeweled Cat Collar
No royal ensemble would be complete without a sparkling accessory. A jeweled cat collar are made of imported leather and adorned with genuine Rhinestones and crystals, each individually set for added beauty and security. They vary in sizes and several eye-catching colors.

Hagen Living World Pet Spa
All princesses relish a day at the spa, and their feline counterparts are no different. The Hagen Living World Pet Spa boasts a multitude of textures and activities that will keep even the fussiest cat interested for hours. The flat surfaces feature accupressure pads that feel wonderful underneath a cat's paws; the center surface is a Ripple Massager topped by a Gum Stimulator for healthy chewing. There are also three Body Stroke Groomers for self-grooming and massage.

Outdoor Bungalow Cat House
Her royal highness can't be expected to stay cramped in one royal residence all year-round! The Outdoor Bungalow Cat House (or, as we like to call it, "The Country House") lets your cat venture outdoors, yet provides a cozy shelter when the wind is howling. Each house comes with three windows, allowing the sun to shine in and your kitty to peer out. And here's a bonus: It's easy on the eyes and unobtrusively blends in with all environments. Add-ons such as a breezeway, a sun deck, a back door, and a second story are up to you and your kitty.

Mink Cape
Sure, your cat already has a fur coat, but even kitties need to make a fashion statement on special occasions. So, why not treat kitty to a luxurious mink cape (faux, of course) that will warm its coat, along with its heart. This is Kitty Couture at its finest!

Adding a New Cat to Your Home

If you've decided to add another feline to your family, don't be surprised if you get a bit of cattitude from your current cat. Your feline friend may have some strong opinions about this new change, and the fact that it is being forced to share your attention.

There are, however, things you can do to create peace. Check out these solutions for the most common problems that come up when our feline family expands.

What's the best way to prep my current cat for the addition of another cat to the household?
A feline is fiercely territorial and may need to warm up to the idea of sharing its space -- and your attention. Two weeks before you bring a new feline into your home, show photos and videos of cats to your current cat, suggests Janet Riley, a cat behaviorist from Naples, Fla. "In a low, reassuring tone, tell the cat that it's getting a brother or sister," she advises. This way, your cat will have some exposure to other felines and be less hesitant about this change. Spending lots of one-on-one time with your cat in the days and weeks leading up to the homecoming will also help prepare your pussycat for the upcoming changes.

What's the best time to bring a new cat home?
Weekends are best, since you'll have more time to focus on orchestrating a smooth transition and to bond with both cats. "Choose a quiet time when the household is calm," says Riley. Avoid times when relatives or friends are visiting, or any period when your current cat is under the weather or recovering from illness.

Should I lock my current cat in a bedroom when I bring my new cat home? What's the best strategy?
Resist the temptation to lock your current cat away while you bring the new cat in. This will only increase its anxiety. Instead, veterinarian Ken Harkin, an associate professor of clinical sciences at Kansas State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, advises that you (or the person your cat is most attached to) sit together in its favorite spot. "Make sure your cat is relaxed," he says. Once your cat is comfortable, have a friend or family member approach with the new cat in its carrier. But skip formal introductions for now. This first meeting should be brief.

Next, place your new cat in a room that has a door and can provide a sense of safety during the transition. (A bathroom or laundry room is ideal.) This is where the new cat's litter box and food should be. Shut the door and allow the new cat to explore its temporary "safe room."

During the next seven days, work on slowly getting your cats comfortable with one another. Let them sniff each other's things from time to time, and crack the door of the "safe room" so they can see one another.

When they meet face-to-face for the first time, Riley suggests enlisting a friend's help again. Sit on opposite sides of a room. For ten minutes, play with your current cat while your friend plays with the new cat. Then, trade off -- you play with the new cat for ten minutes while your friend entertains your other feline. During each "play session," slowly move the cats closer to one another. This exercise teaches the cats that they get special treatment when they're around each other, and that neither is a threat.

My cat has been acting very vocal and aloof since the arrival of our second cat. Is this normal?
Yes. It's typical for your cat to feel anxious about this new arrival, especially if your cat was previously an "only cat." It may display signs of anxiety, such as hiding, increased vocalization or aggressive behavior. Extra attention will help your cat feel secure. Any additional grooming, playtime, or petting will also help to alleviate its fears.

How long will it ultimately take for two cats to accept one another?
This process usually takes about a week, but not always -- so be patient. "It may take a few weeks or more for the cats to establish parameters about how they're going to accept each other," says Dr. Harkin. Ease the transition by giving them separate litter boxes, which allows them each their own "turf." Heap attention on both, and allow the space and time for them to adjust. Eventually the felines will work it out for themselves -- and before you know it, you'll be one big happy family.

Acupuncture for Cats

You knew alternative medicine was catching on with some people, but how about for pets? The truth is, the use of acupuncture on animals traces back to China's Western Jin dynasty, circa 300 A.D. In the western world, animal acupuncture's roots are more recent and seeping into the mainstream. But when might it be appropriate to try it with your cat? And what should you expect from treatment? We asked New York-based veterinarian and certified veterinary acupuncturist Stacey Joy Hershman to provide a fresh look at an age-old therapy.

An Overview
Acupuncture involves inserting thin, sterilized needles into pressure points slightly below the skin for between five and 30 minutes. It works by increasing blood flow, thereby promoting healing, relieving muscle spasms, stimulating nerves and helping to regulate the immune system. In doing all of the aforementioned, it is thought to treat the whole animal, rather than simply treating a set of symptoms. It is often used in conjunction with other treatments, including traditional Western medicine.

Kitty acupuncture is indicated mainly for musculoskeletal problems, skin problems, respiratory problems, gastrointestinal problems, inflammatory problems and cancer (to boost immune functioning and control pain). "Some common chronic illnesses treated with acupuncture include torn ligaments, muscle sprains, slipped discs and arthritis," says Dr. Hershman. 

Success for Some
Concerned about the side effects of conventional medicine, Barbara Stocker of Tuscan, Arizona took her cat to an acupuncturist to treat a hip joint disease. "When my cat, Violet, was diagnosed with hip dysplasia, we thought her fun-filled, active life was over. We didn't want to go with painkillers, so we talked to the vet about acupuncture," Barbara says.  "Violet has responded so well to the treatments. From the beginning, we saw increased mobility and energy. It was obvious that the treatment was alleviating some of her pain." Today, she receives an acupuncture treatment once a month.

Olivia Goldstein of Chicago wasn't sure how her new cat would react to the treatment, but decided to experiment as a last resort. "I adopted an abused cat, and before I adopted her, she'd gotten her front paw stuck in the grill of a car," says Olivia.  "The vet could have amputated the paw, but suggested trying acupuncture first. Apparently, the needles can restore nerve function, and that's what they did. Banjo walks normally now, and doesn't seem to have pain anymore."

Unique Approach to Healing
How a cat responds to acupuncture has a lot to do with its individual temperament. "It depends on the cat," says Dr. Hershman. "Some relax and stay still, or fall asleep. Others won't tolerate the needles." Because cats tend to be more comfortable in their home environment, Dr. Hershman and many other certified veterinary acupuncturists make house calls, though this option is more costly. (For example, Dr. Hershman charges $100 for a house call, plus the cost of the treatment -- between $65 and $80 per application.)

Dr. Hershman notes that the needles can also be used to treat depression and behavioral problems. "After the possibility of any underlying medical issues are ruled out, a cat can receive calming points for anxiety, stress and spraying of urine due to stress," says Dr. Hershman.

Acupuncture isn't a one-shot cure-all, and requires commitment on the part of a cat owner. "Treatment can be once a week for four to eight weeks depending on what the cat is dealing with," explains Dr. Hershman. If relief from symptoms occurs during the initial treatment period, some cats are put on a maintenance schedule of one visit each month.