Cooking at Home for Your Cat

house cat

 

You love a delicious home-cooked meal, right? Turns out that your cat just might enjoy one, too. "The ingredients in homemade cat food are fresh and less processed," says Nathalie LaPierre, a veterinarian at the Lilburn Animal Hospital in Lilburn, Ga. "Digestibility is easier, and the benefits to the cat's body are greater."

And many pet owners take this to heart. Joy H. Bailey of Cartersville, Ga., has been making her cats homemade meals for years. "When I make my cats' food, I'm in control of the ingredients," says Bailey. "I love my cats, and they give that love back tenfold. Why wouldn't I give them the healthiest food I can?" 

Are you ready to hit the kitchen? Before you pick up your frying pan, it's important to know that cats are not able to eat all of the ingredients people can eat. To make sure your efforts result in a safe and healthy meal, learn these important safety rules about cats and food.  

1. Certain foods are toxic for cats
"Never feed your cats chocolate, or anything in the onion family," warns LaPierre. Why? Chocolate contains the compound theobromine, which is a diuretic, as well as a cardiac stimulant. This can cause a pet's heart rate to increase or cause the heart to beat irregularly, both of which can be dangerous to the animal. Onions contain sulfoxides and disulfides which are toxic to the red blood cells of cats and can lead to anemia. Other foods to avoid are pork (including bacon), raw fish, raw eggs or bones. Each of those forbidden foods has its own ill effects on cats.

2. Skip the milk
Even though many people believe cats love a big saucer of milk, most cats are lactose intolerant. "The adult cat has lost its intestinal flora to break down milk properly," Dr. LaPierre says. "It can cause diarrhea in cats. Even kittens shouldn't drink cow milk -- only the milk from their mommies."

3. Don't create a diet for your cat that has vitamin deficiencies
"When you make your own cat food, you risk nutritional deficiencies if you don't prepare it correctly," Dr. LaPierre warns. Consult your vet about suggested vitamin or mineral supplements for your feline.

4. Go by the book
There are many cat cookbooks in bookstores, such as Real Food for Cats: 50 Vet-Approved Recipes to Please the Feline Gastronome by Patti Delmonte (Storey Publishing, LLC), and The Ultimate Treat Cookbook: Homemade Goodies for Finicky Felines by Liz Palika (Howell Book House). Using vet-approved recipes found in books like these will give you peace of mind that your cat is getting all the required nutrients. "I think a cookbook takes some of the risk out of making homemade treats," says Palika.

One of Palika's favorite recipes for felines is for "Sardine Spectacular Cat Treats." The only two ingredients you need are one 3.75 oz. can of sardines in oil, undrained, and a half-cup of plain, unseasoned bread crumbs. Place the sardines and their oil in a food processor or blender and puree to a thick paste (Add a tablespooon of water if the fish doesn't form a paste.) Place the paste in a mixing bowl and add the bread crumbs. Stir until thoroughly combined. Place the mixture in an airtight container in the refrigerator for at least one hour, then store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Bon appétit!