For the Cat that Has Everything

Cats are entitled to be treated like royalty -- at least they seem to think so. We just exist merely to serve their every wish and whim. So give your cats the royal treatment they deserve (and you're all too happy to give) with these regal products, designed to pamper your furry little prince or princess.

Cat Condo
What cat could possibly resist the posh comfort of the stately Cat Condo from Hollywood Kitty Co? Touted as the "cat's meow," this kitty condo provides a place for your royal highness to play, lounge, climb, hide, and scratch. (The front post is covered in sisal, a durable plant fiber that, when woven, resembles a heavy coiled rope.) Great for cats of all ages and abilities.

Chateaneuf du Chat -- Herb du Catnip
Literally translated, its name means "Wine of the Cat," and perhaps rightly so. Let your cat roll in some catnip from this wine-shaped bottle, and it'll behave just like a drunken princess at the ball. Ooh-la-la!

KittyWalk Stroller
For those pampered pusses that have never put their paws to the pavement, we suggest riding in style in the KittyWalk Stroller. This upscale "kitty SUV" allows your cat to experience the great outdoors from the safety of an enclosed space. Made for housecats that love the fresh air, but don't enjoy being led around on a commoner's leash.

Lulu's Garden Retreat Pet Bed
This bed is purrfect for kitties that love to catnap in complete comfort. Lulu's Garden Retreat pet bed is fashioned out of wrought iron and is decorated with carved flowers, braided posts, and a lovely crystal finial fit for a queen. Four feline-friendly pillows are available for surrounding comfort.

A Jeweled Cat Collar
No royal ensemble would be complete without a sparkling accessory. A jeweled cat collar are made of imported leather and adorned with genuine Rhinestones and crystals, each individually set for added beauty and security. They vary in sizes and several eye-catching colors.

Hagen Living World Pet Spa
All princesses relish a day at the spa, and their feline counterparts are no different. The Hagen Living World Pet Spa boasts a multitude of textures and activities that will keep even the fussiest cat interested for hours. The flat surfaces feature accupressure pads that feel wonderful underneath a cat's paws; the center surface is a Ripple Massager topped by a Gum Stimulator for healthy chewing. There are also three Body Stroke Groomers for self-grooming and massage.

Outdoor Bungalow Cat House
Her royal highness can't be expected to stay cramped in one royal residence all year-round! The Outdoor Bungalow Cat House (or, as we like to call it, "The Country House") lets your cat venture outdoors, yet provides a cozy shelter when the wind is howling. Each house comes with three windows, allowing the sun to shine in and your kitty to peer out. And here's a bonus: It's easy on the eyes and unobtrusively blends in with all environments. Add-ons such as a breezeway, a sun deck, a back door, and a second story are up to you and your kitty.

Mink Cape
Sure, your cat already has a fur coat, but even kitties need to make a fashion statement on special occasions. So, why not treat kitty to a luxurious mink cape (faux, of course) that will warm its coat, along with its heart. This is Kitty Couture at its finest!

Clever Cat Scratching & Climbing Posts

Even though every feline has its own personality and quirks, scratching and climbing are second nature for all cats. Because this is an immutable kitty truth,  cat owners should provide a special place for their furry friend to claw, clamber and leap.  If not, you risk a lifetime of shredded sofas and knocked-over knick-knacks (as well as an unhappy companion). Fortunately, there are all kinds of new and entertaining climbers available these days -- enough to meet your cat's demands, as well as your aesthetic sensibility.

Scratching that Itch
Just as you need a good morning stretch to get your day started, your cat also needs a good morning scratch. Scratching is good for your cat's health because it removes dead skin cells from claw sheaths. It also allows your cat to mark territory with scent, and to stretch muscles and ligaments. The best post for your cat, then, is tall enough to allow it to extend to full height; the post should also be sturdy enough for your cat to lean its full body weight on.

Scratching posts are generally covered with rough, shreddable material. Sisal rope and faux fur make the least mess, although many cats prefer scratching on carpeting due to its multiple loops. (Warning: These loops could eventually be shredded and end up in tiny bits on your floor!) When the post is worn out, both sisal rope and carpet posts can be resurfaced with simple carpet tacks or nails.

Kathy Kruger of Plymouth, Michigan found that scratching posts kept her cats from destroying her wooden furniture. "When I first brought Max and Sarah home, they were doing a real number on my kitchen chairs," she recalls. "My vet recommended a sisal post, and they were immediately attracted to that." To encourage a less enthusiastic pet to scratch a new post, reward it for scratching with a treat or some extra affection; you can also rub your cat's paws on the post to deposit its scent, or spray the post with catnip.

The Thrill of the Climb
Cat castles and cat trees are full-service climbing-scratching-lounging destinations. Some are free-standing with heavy bases to prevent tipping, while others extend floor to ceiling, usually relying on a spring-tension rod to keep them upright. They offer cats open areas for sleeping, posts for scratching and multiple levels for leaping. Free-standing models are best for one-cat homes, and for small to medium-size felines. Because they offer more stability, floor-to-ceiling models are more appropriate for multiple-cat dwellings, or large, heavy cats. If your kitty is larger than average, make sure the castle doors are wide enough for it to fit through comfortably.

"When my boyfriend moved in with all of his stuff, there was suddenly less room on my tall bookcases and on top of the refrigerator, and I was worried that my cat Cleo wouldn't get the exercise he needed," says Linda Bain of Garden City, New York. "So we found a nice wooden cat tree on the Internet. It sits unobtrusively in the corner, and Cleo loves it."

House of Style
Satisfying your cat's needs doesn't mean sacrificing your sense of style. The key to combining feline and human furniture is all about blending. "Look first and foremost for color. Make sure it doesn't stand out in contrast to everything else in the room," advises Karen Powell, a Connecticut-based interior designer and co-founder of Decor and You. "Then place the post or gym strategically in relationship to the other furniture, away from the focal point of the room, and outside of the traffic flow." Before you invest, visit a variety of pet supply stores and Web sites to get a broad picture of what's available. Your cat will thank you kindly.

The Best Games for Cats

Your cat is playful, curious and a hunter, and he wants to interact with you to show off his natural skills. Playing games with your cat is a great way to entertain him, as well as give him some extra exercise.

Cats love to chase and hunt, so it’s natural from him to want to exhibit these behaviors for you. Many cats, if given the chance to go outdoors, will actively hunt for birds and other small animals. If they manage to succeed in their hunt, cats will want to show off their conquest by dropping a “gift” at your doorstep. Your cat’s hunting skills will also likely be exhibited if there is a bug or rodent in your home. He will swat, jump around and attempt to kill the intruder.

These hunting and chasing skills can be replicated in games that you play with your cat. Dr. Jeff Werber, DVM, Medical Director for Century Veterinary Group and Chief Veterinarian for ProSense Pet Products, says cats are attracted to movement, and most games for cats capitalize on these instincts, incorporating movement and a chase into the mechanics of the game.

Many cat toys that you’ll find in the store focus on the game of the hunt, and allow you to play along with your cat. If your cat lives indoors, he won’t be able to chase real animals, so it’s a good idea to provide a substitution to entice him to play. “Typical cat toys involve tantalizing the cat with a feather, or a little mouse or rabbit hanging on a string or dangling from a pole, or a ball that circles around a container, sometimes slightly hidden, that attracts the cat's attention and inspires the hunt,” Dr. Werber explains.  

Another great option for a game to play with your cat involves a laser. Your cat will be transfixed by the red laser light and try to catch it. “The cat sees the laser as an object to be chased and hunted down,” said Dr. Werber. “It can be quite comical to watch them trying to grab the laser as it flies by them on the ground, or against a wall.” This game can keep your cat occupied for a while and also provides exercise.

Dr. Werber recommends one other game that has proven popular with cats in the past. “Cats like to lie on their backs and grab and claw at your hand as it comes near their stomach,” he said. “This is fun for them, but not so much for you unless you wear a heavy glove to protect your hands and arm. An alternative version is to stick your hand under the blanket and slowly move toward them, or away, and watch them pounce.”

If your cat loves treats, you can purchase toys that you can hide treats in, too.

It is very important to keep your cat engaged in games that are both enjoyable and a good source of exercise. Your cat will make it known if he is bored, and walk away from you or the toy. Dr. Werber says that your cat may be bored with one activity but another one might continue to entertain him. Mixing up the games and toys will help keep your cat happy.

Bring the Outdoors In

Cats love the great outdoors. Unfortunately, the outdoors might not always love them back. With so many potential threats, ranging from automobiles to not-so-friendly animals, allowing your cat to roam free isn't smart or safe in today's environment.

But your indoor cat need not be deprived.  Whether you live in an apartment building or in a house with a yard, you can create a cat-friendly indoor-outdoor space that provides the essence of a wilderness adventure, without exposure to any of the risks.

The possibilities are endless, ranging from a small window box, to a state-of-the-art screened-in porch. The type of space you create depends on a few factors:  how much space you have available, what you can spend, how handy you are at building things, and your property's legal limitations. If you're renting, be sure to ask your landlord before making changes to the rental. And homeowners should check local building ordinance laws before adding to the home or property.

If space and money are obstacles, consider a window box -- which you can either build or buy. These are about the size of a window air conditioner, and work well for apartment dwellers. The frame is usually an acrylic material, spanned with claw-proof screen or Plexiglas for kitty's panoramic view. The most important part of installing such an enclosure is to make sure it is 100 percent secure. It must be able to withstand the weight of several cats without collapsing, weather conditions, and would-be house thieves.

If you have a yard, consider building or buying a structure you and your cat can use, such as a screened porch or patio. Using claw-proof screen will ensure that your cat can't get out and other animals can't get in. This screen is made of polyester (instead of aluminum, which animal claws can tear easily), with a nylon or vinyl coating. Cats can actually climb it without doing any damage.

Supervision of time spent in the enclosure should be a priority, too, especially in extreme weather and temperature conditions. Make sure your cat has access to a litter box, food and fresh water. You should include a floor in the enclosure, instead of placing it directly on the ground to eliminate digging opportunities. A floor helps to keep fleas and ticks out of your enclosure, and prevents kitty from accidentally eating plants or grass that might have been poisoned with run-off fertilizer or pesticides. Lush plants and grass in pots on your porch will provide the jungle environment your cat craves.

By bringing the outdoors inside, you can keep your cat safe, happy and in touch with the sounds, sights and smells of nature.

Exercise for Couch Potato Cats

Many is the cat owner who comes home to find the resident feline sprawled out on the couch -- in exactly the same place it was several hours before. If this sounds familiar, then your cat is probably in need of a little feline physical fitness.

Exercise is beneficial to your cat in several ways. For one, it can alleviate the boredom that sometimes leads to bouts of bad behavior, says Nancy Peterson, an issues specialist at The Humane Society of the United States in Washington, D.C. A little workout might ward off situations that involve chewing the legs of your dining room chairs, swinging on curtains, playing with your clothing, and so on.

Regular exercise can also keep your pet healthy and prevent disease. According to Peterson, heavier cats face a higher risk of developing heart problems and feline diabetes. And the more your cat exercises, the greater its muscle strength and flexibility, says James R. Richards, a veterinarian and director of the Cornell Feline Health Center at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in Ithaca, New York. "A lot of cats live indoors these days, which is beneficial for their health in terms of keeping them away from infectious agents outdoors. But we have a lot of bored, fat, couch potato cats out there. The high point of their day is when they jump off the couch and head to the feeding dish."

Consider it your job to keep your cat interested in some sort of exercise, says Jean Duddy, DVM, a veterinarian who specializes in internal medicine at Angell Animal Medical Center in Boston. "If your cat tends to be sedentary and you don't change that pattern, it will remain sedentary," she says. "Keep at it even when your cat walks away."

Experiment with different toys until you find some that capture your cat's interest and excitement. Some felines love interactive wand-like gadgets that prompt them to leap in the air, while other cats prefer to sit in hiding and pounce on objects, says Peterson. "Even older cats can be enticed to play with most wand toys," Peterson says. "But regardless of age, what's most important is to make exercise a routine part of the day. An adult cat will benefit from at least twice-a-day play sessions, preferably at set times." To keep things fun, rotate the toys on a weekly basis so that boredom doesn't set in. 

Finally, if your cat is already overweight, be sure to speak to your veterinarian before jump-starting a regular exercise routine. Your vet can rule out any underlying medical issues that should be treated, or considered, in advance.